Black Inventors in Technology: Granville T. Woods aka “Black Edison”

Granville T Woods - Electric Railway System

Granville T. Woods, also Known as “Black Edison,” registered nearly 60 patents in his lifetime, including a telephone transmitter, a trolley wheel and the multiplex telegraph. Woods’s most important invention was the multiplex telegraph, also known as the “induction telegraph,” in 1887. The device allowed people to communicate by voice over telegraph wires, which helped speed up important communications and prevent crucial errors such as train accidents. Woods defeated Thomas Edison’s lawsuit that challenged his patent, and turned down Edison’s offer to make him a partner. Thereafter, Woods was often known as “Black Edison.”

LMU Faculty and Staff: Learn More About Box Edit

Box Edit is a feature that allows you to edit or create files directly on Box. Designed for all file types, browsers, and platforms, Box Edit uses the default application installed on your computer to edit or create simple and centralized content: DOCX files open in Microsoft Word, PPTX files open in Microsoft PowerPoint, XLSX files open in Excel, and so forth.

You can download Box Edit here.

The Box Edit installer package is available for both the Mac (DMG format) and Windows (MSI format).

1. Click the Get Box Edit button and download the Box Edit installer.
2. Run the Box Edit installer and follow instructions to install or update Box Edit on your computer.
3. After the install is complete, you must restart your browser to activate the new Box Edit version. Once you restart your browser, the latest version of Box Edit is activated and will automatically receive all future updates.

Once you download and install Box Edit, it will be available on any browser on your computer. Box Edit supports all browsers supported by the Box web application such as Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox, and Chrome. However, it currently does not work on mobile browsers.

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Meet Your Instructional Technologist: Jeff Schwartz

LMU ITS has a great Instructional Technology department ready to help faculty use technology in teaching. An Instructional Technologist is embedded in each college and school on campus, and you can also find them in the Faculty Innovation Center on Level 3 of the Library. In order to help you get to know this department, we created our new video series, Meet Your Instructional Technologist. For the next few weeks, you’ll meet the helpful people in this department and get to know them a bit better.

This week meet Jeff Schwartz, Instructional Technologist for the College of Business Administration!

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Tech Time Management Monday: stickK.com

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stickK.com

This website keeps you on track to your goals by having you put up money against yourself. Let’s say you want to spend three hours on Saturday working on a research paper. All you have to do is set that as a goal, assign a reasonable amount of money to it (say, $10-$20) and then indicate where you want that money to go if you don’t “stickK” to your goal. You can have the money go to a charity, family member, or several places. Usually when money is involved people get serious, so stickK.com might be the answer to a procrastinator’s struggle!

Black Inventors in Technology: Inventor of the Cataract Laserphaco Probe

dr p:bath

Dr. Patricia Bath becoming the first African American female doctor to patent a medical invention. Patricia Bath’s patent was for a method of removing cataract lenses by using a laser device. Bath’s dedication to the treatment and prevention of blindness led to her invention of the Cataract Laserphaco Probe, which was designed to use the power of a laser to quickly and painlessly vaporize cataracts from patients’ eyes, replacing the more common method of using a grinding, drill-like device to remove the afflictions.

With another one of Bath’s inventions she was able to restore sight to people who had been blind for over 30 years. She also holds patents for her invention in Japan, Canada, and Europe.

patricia bath patent 1

Meet Your Instructional Technologist: Michelle Yeung

LMU ITS has a great Instructional Technology department ready to help faculty use technology in teaching. An Instructional Technologist is embedded in each college and school on campus, and you can also find them in the Faculty Innovation Center on Level 3 of the Library. In order to help you get to know this department, we created our new video series, Meet Your Instructional Technologist. For the next few weeks, you’ll meet the helpful people in this department and get to know them a bit better.

This week meet Michelle Yeung, Instructional Technologist for the Seaver College of Science & Engineering!

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LMU Faculty and Staff: Have You Checked Out Box?

box

Box is a secure, cloud-based document management, collaboration, and storage service. After meeting with focus groups this spring, ITS selected Box as an ideal way for faculty and staff to store and share their personal work and departmental files.

Check out some FAQs and the video below:

Who gets Box?
All current LMU faculty and staff.

What is Box?
Box is a secure file sharing and storage service that enables you to store your work documents and files in the cloud, and access those documents anywhere you can connect to the Internet. You can also share your documents with colleagues, students, external vendors, and more.

How do I get a Box account?
As of December 1, 2014, your Box account will be created as soon as you login to http://box.lmu.edu using your LMU credentials. You can access your Box account as long as you are an active LMU faculty or staff member.

How do I log in to Box?
Just go to http://lmu.box.com, click the “Continue” button, and then enter your MYLMU username and password on the LMU Authentication page and click the “Login” button.

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How much storage space do I get?
LMU Box users get 150GB of storage, which is 15 times more storage than on the network (F:\ and G:\) drives.

I have over 150GB of files, can I get a larger quota?
Although Box can technically support larger quotas, its primary purpose is to support smaller collections of “active” files. In most cases, users with over 50GB of files are actually looking to archive files, or they have a few very large files that won’t perform well in Box. Please contact the Help Desk to arrange a discussion of your needs – often we find other solutions are more appropriate than a larger Box quota.

Why Box?
After a thorough evaluation of 10 different products, Box was selected as the appropriate tool to address LMU’s need for cloud based file storage. Box provides larger quotas, data security (with complete data encryption) and has an easy-to-use interface. You can also view, upload, and share documents from any location or device, as long as you have an Internet connection.

Any restrictions on what I can/should keep in Box?
Departmental and individual files (documents, spreadsheets, presentations, Microsoft Outlook data files (.pst), that relate to your work should be kept in Box.

• For storage of departmental video and audio, use Kaltura via MYLMU Connect.
• To store your course-specific documents, use MYLMU Connect.
• Keep your short-term communications and attachments in your email. Though, once you get started with Box, it will be very easy to share a link to a file you’d typically attach to an email, and have all of the people on the email be able to access it, anywhere on any device.

Tech Training Tuesday: Improving Your Memory

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Memory is not a finite resource, and with techniques like repetition, association, and visualization, you can improve your memory before it starts to fade. This fascinating course shows viewers of all ages how to improve their recall. It explains how and when to employ tricks such as mnemonic devices, rhymes, stories, and alliteration. And it explains the best methods for different situations, like remembering names, important dates, passwords, to-do lists, quotes, and more. These techniques will prove invaluable, whether you’re memorizing facts for a test at school, points for a work presentation, or trivia to impress your friends.

Topics include:

  • Memory principles that work
  • Taking notes
  • Using songs and rhyming techniques to remember details
  • Building a “memory palace”
  • Remembering names and passwords
  • Memorizing long texts and speeches

HOW TO LOGIN:

  1. Go to mylmu.edu and log in using your LMU credentials.
  2. Click on the “Systems Login” menu.
  3. Scroll down and click on “lynda.com (online training library)”
  4. Click on the “Start Now” button and you will be redirected to lynda.com.
  5. Once you are logged in to lynda.com, click the screenshot at the    top of this post and you will be redirected to the Improving Your Memory course!