Tech Training Tuesday: The 5 Step Creative Process

5 step creative process

The creative process isn’t just “generating ideas.” The reality is it’s a five-step process, and ideation is only one of those steps. The entire creative process is made up of objective finding, data gathering, problem design, ideation, and selection. Understanding the role of each step enables us to ensure that we generate the most effective solutions. In this course, Stefan Mumaw guides us through the five steps and then shows us what the complete process looks like, with a real-world project: designing a website.

HOW TO LOGIN:

  1. Go to mylmu.edu and log in using your LMU credentials.
  2. Click on the “Systems Login” menu.
  3. Scroll down and click on “lynda.com (online training library)”
  4. Click on the “Start Now” button and you will be redirected to lynda.com.
  5. Once you are logged in to lynda.com, click the screenshot at the    top of this post and you will be redirected to the 5 Step Creative Process course!

Women in Technology: Roberta Williams

roberta

Roberta Williams is one of the most influential PC game designers of the 80’s & 90’s and has been credited with creating the graphic adventure genre. Sierra On-Line, later known as Sierra Entertainment was the name of the company Roberta & her husband Ken WIlliams  founded.

Williams’ games taught logic and problem-solving skills, but made it seem like an adventure the entire time, in much the same way that gamification transforms ordinary things like, location check-ins, into an exciting quest to collect digital badges.

You can see  Roberta’s ideas and concepts in other gaming genres, like fighting games that almost always include a “quest” mode where the fighter must battle his way through to seal his victory.

Women in Technology Website Spotlight: NCWIT.org

NCWIT.org

The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) is a non-profit community of more than 575 universities, companies, non-profits, and government organizations nationwide working to increase women’s participation in computing and technology. NCWIT equips change leaders with resources for taking action in recruiting, retaining, and advancing women from K–12 and higher education through industry and entrepreneurial careers.

NCWIT works to correct the imbalance of gender diversity in technology and computing because gender diversity positively correlates with a larger workforce, better innovation, and increased business performance. Increasing the number of women in technology and computing also has the potential to improve the design of products and services to better serve a more diverse population, and increase economic and social well-being by providing more women with stable and lucrative careers.

Learn more about NCWIT here.

Tech Training Tuesday: Computer Security & Internet Safety Fundamentals

comp security fund

Learn how to safeguard your computers and laptops, keep your digital data secure, and protect your privacy online. This course is a beginner’s guide to cybersecurity, showing you ways to prevent malware, viruses, and security breaches on your computers and networks. First, author Jess Stratton guides you through securing your computer—with antivirus software, firewalls, and encryption—and protecting your wireless network. See how to adjust privacy and security settings in popular web browsers, avoid phishing scams, use public Wi-Fi safely, and enable two-step verification for more-secure logins. Then take steps to bolster your online privacy, including choosing better usernames and turning on Do Not Track requests, as well as the privacy of others, by blurring out sensitive information in photos and emails. By the end of this course, you’ll know how to secure your computer and laptop and keep your information safe online.

Topics include:

  • Installing updates
  • Using antivirus software and protecting against viruses
  • Enabling Windows Firewall
  • Using password-management software
  • Encrypting files that contain sensitive data
  • Securing your router and protecting the SSID
  • Understanding the signs of a secure website
  • Checking settings for Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari
  • Unsubscribing from email subscriptions
  • Reviewing site privacy settings
  • Browsing on a public computer
  • Understanding cookies
  • Protecting other people’s names and locations
  • Fact-checking email warnings

HOW TO LOGIN:

  1. Go to mylmu.edu and log in using your LMU credentials.
  2. Click on the “Systems Login” menu.
  3. Scroll down and click on “lynda.com (online training library)”
  4. Click on the “Start Now” button and you will be redirected to lynda.com.
  5. Once you are logged in to lynda.com, click the screenshot at the    top of this post and you will be redirected to the Computer Security & Internet Safety Fundamentals course!

Women in Technology: Susan Kare

susan_kare_mac

Susan Kare was the designer who helped bring the Apple computer to life with her typography and iconic graphic design skills. She shaped many of the now-common interface elements of the Mac, like the command icon. She also created the Happy Mac icon, which greeted Apple users when they booted their machines, and the trash can icon. Susan’s efforts to make the computer feel more like a friend, and less like a machine.Kare’s design work didn’t stop with Apple, her designs can be seen in many of Facebook’s “digital gifts,” including the friendly rubber ducky.

Women in Technology Website Spotlight: GirlsInTechLA.org

girls in tech la

Girls in Tech (GIT) is an non-profit organization founded in 2007 that was born out of a need to provide a place for women to cultivate ideas around their careers and business concepts involving technology.  GIT focuses on the engagement, education and empowerment of like-minded, professional, intelligent and influential women in technology.

The Los Angeles Chapter of Girls in Tech, (GITLA) is 100% volunteer-run by collaborating with community partners and volunteers. They are committed to forging the next generation of technology leaders through their partner mentorship programs, that work with girls in middle school and high school, and with college women to educate and promote interest in STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts Math) disciplines.

GIT aims to offer a variety of resources including educational workshops and lectures, networking functions, round table discussions, conferences, social engagements, and recruitment events to supplement and further enhance women in their professional careers and aspirations in technology. Girls in Tech currently supports over 17,000 members spread between 37 active chapters worldwide.

Learn more by visiting the Girls In Tech website here.

Meet Your Instructional Designer: Josh Rivera

LMU ITS has a great Instructional Technology department ready to help faculty use technology in teaching. An Instructional Technologist is embedded in each college and school on campus, and you can also find them in the Faculty Innovation Center on Level 3 of the Library. In order to help you get to know this department, we created our new video series, Meet Your Instructional Technologist. For the next few weeks, you’ll meet the helpful people in this department and get to know them a bit better.

This week meet Josh Rivera, Instructional Designer for the School of Education!

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Tech Training Tuesday: Brainstorming Basics

brainstorming basics

What is brainstorming? Invented in 1948, brainstorming is still the dominant technique when it comes to idea generation. It combines creativity, problem solving, and group discussion. Unfortunately for creator Alex Osborn, most brainstorms fail before they ever begin. Why? Because the organizer doesn’t have a clear picture of the purpose, process, or intended outcome. In this course, Stefan Mumaw brings brainstorming into the modern age, with rules and techniques that will help you set up and run more-effective creative brainstorming sessions.

HOW TO LOGIN:

  1. Go to mylmu.edu and log in using your LMU credentials.
  2. Click on the “Systems Login” menu.
  3. Scroll down and click on “lynda.com (online training library)”
  4. Click on the “Start Now” button and you will be redirected to lynda.com.
  5. Once you are logged in to lynda.com, click the screenshot at the    top of this post and you will be redirected to the Brainstorming Basics course!